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Thanks for the reviews!

There have been two very nice reviews of Nicholas C. Rossis‘ short story collection, The Power of Six (Plus One), which includes one of my short stories.

So I thought I’d point them out and thank the respective authors for their time reading and reviewing this anthology. I hear from Nicholas that his book went to #1 (so what if it’s in an “obscure subcategory”, as he puts it… details, schmetails ūüėČ ), so congrats to him on¬†that achievement!

T. J. Hapney

The first one¬†was from T. J. Hapney, who summarises and reviews each of the seven short stories, saying that “each story is designed to make you think outside of the box regarding how we perceive things, which I really enjoy and found it to be a bargain for under $1”. She¬†concludes that “this was a fun read, especially for those who enjoy short stories”, giving it 4 out of 5 stars.

Here’s what she had to say about my contribution,¬†Big Bang:

Big Bang by Amos M. Carpenter was an interesting story along the same line of those that Nicholas Rossis did in this collection. I really enjoyed reading Big Bang. It was definitely a different and witty way to look at how life in the universe may have begun. I found the story interesting and the writing style complemented Mr. Rossis’ so that the story did not seem out-of-place.

http://tjhapney.wordpress.com/2014/10/23/book-review-the-power-of-six-by-nicholas-c-rossis/

Thanks for the kind words, TJ!

Daniel J. Dombrowski

Daniel’s review is also very flattering, likewise summarising his thoughts on each separate short story. From someone who “grew up reading Asimov” and later “fell in love with the voluminous short fiction of Philip K. Dick”,¬†I consider his positive words to be very encouraging.

The Power of Six […] will appeal most to readers who have already read and enjoy short fiction from the masters of days gone by. […] This is a solid collection of stories worthy of your time and money (a scant $.99) regardless of your genre inclinations.

http://thirtythirdstreet.com/2014/10/ebook-review-power-six-nicholas-rossis-nicholas_rossis/

Thank you, Daniel, for the detailed review.

Back to it

And now… for (most of) the rest of this Saturday, I’m going back to¬†working on my book. Yay! ūüôā

Douglas Adams – A to Z: D

D is for Douglas Adams, the author who wrote¬†The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, the Dirk Gently series, and a number of other books, TV series scripts (including Doctor Who¬†and Monty Python’s Flying Circus), and many scripts for BBC radio broadcasts. He was born in 1952 and passed away in 2001, depriving the world of one of the greatest comedic writers.

Apart from being a writer of some of the funniest books I’ve ever read, he was also actively engaged in raising awareness of¬†endangered species and environmental issues.

Some of the things that still make me smile years after last reading the HHGG books (I really should make the time to re-read them, shouldn’t I?)¬†and the things that are running “insider jokes” among many people I know who have read them as well, are listed below. If I really stopped to think about it, I’d probably write half a novel’s worth, so here goes, just off the top of my head:

  • Towels¬†– never go anywhere without them.
  • 42 – the answer to the ultimate question about Life, the Universe, and Everything. Seeking an answer to this ultimate question, some hyper-intelligent beings build a supercomputer, which, after several million years of calculations, announces that the ultimate answer is… 42. They then figure out that they may need to find the actual ultimate question, and end up building an even more powerful computer, which is so huge that it is commonly mistaken for a planet (sorry, slight spoiler: that computer is… Earth). The number of cultural references to this number is staggering.
  • Don’t Panic” – one of the reasons the HHGG has outsold the Encyclopedia Galactica is that it has these words written on the cover in large, friendly letters. (The other being that it is slightly cheaper.)
  • Mostly Harmless¬†– the two-word entry in the HHGG on the topic “Earth”. The entry used to be “Harmless”, but Ford Prefect, after spending years stuck on earth, submitted a lengthy article to the HHGG, which was then edited down to these two words.
  • An SEP – anything not your problem, or something you don’t want to deal with just now, is considered to be “an SEP” (Someone Else’s Problem).
  • The Rain God – a truck driver who doesn’t know he’s actually the God of Rain and absolutely¬†hates any form of rain. Of course, since rain loves its god, it always rains wherever he drives, and he is constantly miserable. He’s read that eskimos have 217 (I could well be¬†remembering that incorrectly, but you get the point) types of snow (including the yellow kind¬†on which the sled dogs have peed), and he has names for¬†over 300 types of rain. To confirm¬†his theory that the one currently happening is the one he thinks is a particularly nasty type where it doesn’t matter whether he has the windscreen wipers on or off, he switches¬†them off. It gets worse, and one of the wiper blades starts to get loose. In the book, there follows a one-sentence paragraph that, despite being made up entirely of¬†onomatopoetic words, describes what follows to such perfection that I¬†start giggling stupidly just thinking about it (sorry if I don’t get this entirely right, I don’t have the book in front of me): “Swish swish swish flop swish swish flop swish flop swish flop flop flap scrape.”
  • This is not her story” – after the prologue introduces a character who finally figures out how everyone in the world can live together in harmony, and has the reader wanting to know what this wonderful solution is, it ends with the sentence, “This is not her story.” (I think it was the fourth book that has almost the exact same prologue, except that it ends with, “This is her story.”)
  • Pain – there is a section in one of the HHGG books where Arthur Dent tries to figure out where he is hurt, and¬†every body part he touches causes a jolt of pain. After a while, he finally figures out that it is in fact his hand that is injured….
  • Marvin the paranoid android – worth a separate blog entry¬†in the A to Z Challenge.
  • I’m sure there are countless more… but I’ll stop here ūüôā
Don't Panic - Towel Day

“Don’t Panic” – the famous words written on the fictional “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” in the (real) novel of the same name are shown here on a towel on Towel Day… if that doesn’t make sense, read at least the first HHGG book.

Thank you, Douglas Adams, wherever you may be (he was a self-declared “radical atheist”) for many,¬†many laughs.

So long, and thanks for all the fish.